Terry runs for Terry in Brampton

Family at Terry Fox Race in Brampton.

Terry Wood, her son and daughter-in-law, and grandson Dylan, at the Heart Lake Terry Fox Run 2016 in Brampton. (Divya Rajan/photo)

By Divya Rajan, Centennial Journalism

At the age of twenty-one, Terry Wood’s brother Richard was diagnosed with cancer. It was 2001, and the Brampton woman decided to channel her emotions to help the cause and start organizing for the Terry Fox event held at the local school that bears Terry Fox’s name. Wood did eventually lose her brother to cancer, but this kept her pushing to stay involved.

“It was a terrible thing, and a very sad thing but it’s life,” Wood said Sunday at the annual Terry Fox Run at the Heart Lake location.

Families gathered in teams teams at the rear field of the Terry Fox school. It has been hosting runs since the early 2000s.

The Terry Fox Run is an annual event in Canada. Year after year, millions gather together to raise awareness and money, in memory of the British Columbian athlete who died of cancer in 1981.  Fox’s leg was amputated in 1977 after being diagnosed with cancer. He embarked on his journey across Canada as an amputee in 1980, running to raise cancer awareness. After 143 days and 5,373 kilometres, cancer forced Fox to end his run. Fox died June 28, 1981 at the age of twenty-two. Since then, the Terry Fox Run has been one of the biggest fundraising events in Canada.

This event not only signifies strength, but is also a symbol of hope for many people who are battling or who know someone who is. Kathy Brydon had a stronger reason to run for Terry Fox this year. Her family has done the run in previous years but this one is in honour of her uncle.

“We have one family member who is battling and two family members on our team who have beat cancer,” Brydon said.

With big smiles, the Brydon family joined the run and helped raise money to support their goal of abolishing cancer.

“Because we still need to raise more money and more awareness, because it is not a solved problem yet,” she said. 

This event not only signifies strength, but is also a symbol of hope for many people who are battling or who know someone who is. Wearing their running shoes, the Wood family came together to support and also organize this year’s run. Wood explained that her children also went to the Terry Fox School, so they had been involved with the run before now.

“It’s spreading the word on what Terry Fox did for this country… His mission was to raise awareness,” Wood said.

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